SOMETHING ABOUT SUKI

Suki Waterhouse

 

You’ll likely recognize Suki Waterhouse from international runways

like Burberry, and, more recently, big Hollywood screens like Pokémon Detective Pikachu.In addition to artfully navigating the line of relevance between silver-screen muse and fashion ‘It’ girl, what this multitalent has planned may surprise you.

 

“Life teaches you how to live

it, if you live it long enough,” per Tony Bennett,is one of Suki Waterhouse’s favorite quotes. While at 27, the blonde, 60s-spirited darling hasn’t yet lived very long, she’s lived a lot. Scouted at age 15 by a modeling agency in her hometown of London, the multihyphenate has since expanded her résumé to capture work as an actor, singer, songwriter, and accessory designer.

But it certainly didn’t come duty-free: “I definitely haven’t always found it all easy. There’s definitely been [periods] that I would say were not great, but I’m quite glad that I went through a lot of life quite young.”

When Waterhouse first started modeling, the industry and the work were not an immediate fit. “I think when you’re 15 or 16, you look at models in such high regard, and I thought it was not something I could do at all. It was quite a lot of pressure when I first started. I was not suddenly doing great stuff, which is kind of nice because I feel like I do understand a model’s plight.” Waterhouse describes having to go on “millions and millions of castings” in heels that were too tall and outfits that were all wrong to compensate for her 5’8” height.

“I had kind of crazy style,” she explains, “I wore mad, mad outfits just to distract from the fact that I wasn’t very tall. I got everything off eBay at that point.” Among some of the nascent model’s greatest looks: oversized, checkered combat trousers, and white tights and white ankle boots due to her momentary obsession with “fancy dress” (“some of the stuff is unfortunate today,” she jokes). “My agency was always trying to get me to buy a t-shirt and little skirt and that was my idea of hell. I was really quite a tomboy and stomping around in these big Doc Martens.”\

 

Suki Waterhouse

 

 

“Life teaches you how to live it, if you live it long enough”

As she entered her late teens, Waterhouse started looking to starlets like Anita Pallenberg and Marianne Faithfull for style cues (oversized sunglasses, statement coats, choppy bangs).
And, these reference points laid much of the inspirational groundwork for her retro, hyper-femme accessories line, Pop & Suki, that she launched with one of her close friends, Poppy Jamie. The entrepreneurs met in a Los Angeles nightclub although they both grew up in London and had plenty of mutual friends while Waterhouse was pursuing modeling and acting, and Jamie television presenting. Quickly becoming inseparable, the duo came up with the idea (during one of their frequent, hours-long phone conversations) to create elegant yet functional bags that they (and every other It Girl) would want to wear.
And soon, they (and every other It Girl) were wearing them, personalized with their own name.At the same time, Waterhouse was also acting most recently appearing in Pokémon Detective Pikachu, Love Rosie, and Insurgent. “I just follow the things I actually enjoy doing, like if it’s working with a director or on a film that I’m just so, so stoked about.”But before Waterhouse was all of these things, she was a musician. “I’ve just always done it. It’s really natural to me.”
However, she modestly doesn’t consider her music to be anything other than a hobby, only ever putting out three songs “because I have to be really sad and have some major life moment. And I have to be perfect. It’s the scariest thing. I can’t just be like ‘Oh,
I’m going to put it out like Willy Nilly.’ I have to be 100 percent.” The titles she has released—Brutally, Good Looking, and Stoned—are “for listening in the back of the car and when you’re just like despondently looking out the window, yearning and missing”..”

“I’ve learned that you don’t have to do everything. Sometimes, it’s better to hold back and wait for the right time… I really believe in the waiting game and then striking at the right time…”

Suki Waterhouse

 

 

Suki Waterhouse

 

 

And while Waterhouse will undoubtedly continue singing and songwriting, she’s also busy navigating her next venture—a business-focused summer camp for young women. “Girls aren’t taught about business at all growing up while I think the boys always are. And we just get left out of those conversations as women a lot of the time.” Waterhouse dreams of creating a place for young women to go, where they can discuss all of the ins-and-outs of business, like shares and how to actually start a company, while cultivating community and learning from one another. “I think it would be incredibly helpful for anyone to start from the basics. I’ve been fortunate enough to learn a lot but I still have a lot of new information to take on.”

Suki Waterhouse

 

At 27 years young, Waterhouse has learned the importance of discretion and retreat—the power of saying ‘no’–and only pursuing projects she’s passionate about. “I’ve learned that you don’t have to do everything. Sometimes, it’s better to hold back and wait for the right time. People are so worried about not having it all come through at the same time as everyone else. I really believe in the waiting game and then striking at the right time—but you have to be prepared.”

 

Suki Waterhouse

 

“Girls aren’t taught about business at all, growing up while I think the boys always are.

And we just get left out of those conversations as women a lot of the time.”


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